February 2019
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Month February 2019

update 2

Just 3 micro-posts, something ahead of real reports soon.

First,

the most amazing road, between Mopipi and the A3 to Maum. To the left is the great Kalahari plain north of the pans. To the right the beginning of the greenery south of the delta. Storm ahead, like everyday somewhere over or around the Okavango in rainy season

In rainy season (now) the clouds appear out of nowhere fast. The dark cloud bottoms get close to the ground and above the sky roils. The storm lasts between 30 minutes and 4 or 5 hours.¬†When the localized cloud above you bursts it is the heaviest I’ve ever seen, worse than the worst of Indonesian monsoon.

Here I’m running into whiteout. You can see how quickly heavy turns into very heavy and you have to stop the car

Edit: Car? Yes, not bike. It’s a one day 950K drive to Gaborone, where I’m working on something, which is twice too far for me, on my windshieldless enduro.

Second,

far to the north, on the Boro river channel, the largest of the delta tributaries. You can follow it to Angola for a few months a year. Right now the rainy season hasn’t reached the point the delta floods. Currently there is much more land than water, and a couple of months from now there’ll be much more water than land. Here we are, a few hours north of the village of Boro. Three fish eagles ahead

The village of Boro is classic yet vanishing Botswana. If you want to see what that looks like, click below

Thirdly,

Gaborone, the capital. Below (taken out a taxi window) is the tallest building in the country. Plus the picture tells you a lot more of what you need to know

Story to follow.

update

We’re in Gaborone (Gabs), the capital city. It’s at the southern edge of Botswana (Bots), almost on the S.A. border. We’re doing business, maybe, of all strange things to happen.

Since we last posted, a lot has happened. We’ll do the posts next weekend. Here’s a nice video of cows crossing the Thamalakane River. As a storm comes in they head for home

And since we’re on fauna, a cellphone shot outside my friend Miss T’s house of an 8′ cobra eating a 3′ cobra

It can’t bite at this point, so safe to get in close.